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Apollo/Saturn and Moon tree Garden

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Statue of the Apollo 11 crew in the Moon Tree Garden, sponsored by Rocket Mortgage. Friday was the opening of the Moon Tree Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
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Statue of the Apollo 11 crew in the Moon Tree Garden, sponsored by Rocket Mortgage. Friday was the opening of the Moon Tree Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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The statue of the Apollo 11 astronauts, sponsored by Rocket Mortgage, on display in the Moon Tree Garden, shot through the leaves of the moon tree. Friday was the opening of a Moon Tree. Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
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The statue of the Apollo 11 astronauts, sponsored by Rocket Mortgage, on display in the Moon Tree Garden, shot through the leaves of the moon tree. Friday was the opening of a Moon Tree. Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. MALCOLM DENEMARK/FLORIDA TODAY
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Friday was the opening of the Moon Tree Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
Buy Photo
Friday was the opening of the Moon Tree Garden and preview of the reimagined Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.

Tickets are now sale for the annual Bonfire Extravaganza at Kenilworth Castle hosted by Kenilworth Round Table.

The event, which celebrates the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605, kicks off at 5pm and winds down around 9pm.

The Bonfire Night fireworks event hosted by the Kenilworth Round Table.

The Bonfire Night fireworks event hosted by the Kenilworth Round Table.

The fireworks event in its 32nd year is offering a new online ticketing system through Eventbrite.

The 2019 event will also bring changes to lighting at the event and music this year will be based around a theme of the Apollo missions – 'It’s been 50 years since we took our first steps on the moon.'

Tickets are now on sale through local outlets to buy, which are Kenilworth Books, Lil Greens, the Kenilworth Castle Shop, Bakers Dozen and Warwick University Students Union.

Adult tickets are £10, child and senior tickets are £5.

The Kenilworth fireworks event has also been listed as the No. 2 best place for fireworks on the Camping & Caravan Club UK top 10 fireworks for 2019.

As well as the entertainment there is a range of food and warming drinks available across the field from a number of tents and stalls.

The bonfire chair, Tom Shearer, said: "This year is my second year as bonfire chair, and as with all bonfire events we try to make them better than the last, in terms of both entertainment and safety for the crowd.

"You’ll need to come and see for yourself how we’ve changed it this year, but having seen the virtual display I can say for sure it’ll be very different to last year. "

The event raises funds available for local charities in and around Kenilworth and last year raised around £30,000.

Kenilworth Round Table is open to guys 18-45 years old if they want to join one of the social activities or help out at the charity events.

OBU’s Hurley College of Science and Mathematics will welcome Don Cooper, OBU class of 1960, to campus for two lectures Monday, Oct. 14. The first general lecture, “Apollo: How We Went to the Moon,” will be held at 10 a.m., while the second mathematical lecture, “Deriving the Equations for the Saturn V Guidance System,” will be held at 1 p.m. Both lectures will take place in the Tulsa Royalties Auditorium in Bailey Business Center.

Cooper graduated with honors from OBU in 1960 with a degree in physics and minors in mathematics and chemistry. He attended graduate school at the University of Alabama.

He then went to work for the Army Ballistic Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama, as a member of the Advanced Design Laboratory. They designed a new missile for the Army that was deployed to NATO.

In 1961, he transferred to NASA as a mathematician at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in the Guidance Theory Section, helping to create the trans-lunar targeting equations for the manned Apollo missions. NASA archives contain a number of his publications. In 1965, he moved to Houston and worked on the Apollo missions at the Johnson Space Center. He also worked on the operations team during the Apollo 13 crisis, performing valuable calculations which ultimately brought the crew safely back to Earth.

In 1972, he joined TRW Controls as a software project manager to create control systems for electric utility companies. He left TRW to start FD Systems to sell and install inventory control software. After 15 years, he sold FD Systems and joined Professional Compounding Centers of America as the Chief Information Systems Officer.

Since retiring in 2002, he has volunteered to speak at schools and libraries about the moon landing and to show how a practical application of calculus created the Saturn V Apollo guidance equations.

It’s been 50 years since humans first stepped on the surface of the moon. To celebrate the anniversary of the Apollo 11 Mission, the Reston Historic Trust & Museum is hosting a special exhibit until the end of the year.

The traveling exhibit, which is called Destination Moon: The Apollo Mission, features posters provided by the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibition service and developed with the National Air and Space Museum.

The exhibit features the command module Columbia — the only portion of the spacecraft to return from the mission in 1961 — as well as other mission-related objects.

Here’s more from Smithsonian about the exhibit tour:

The Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission traveling exhibition will bring the iconic Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia to four cities–its first national tour since 1970/71. The exhibition will also include one-of-a-kind artifacts from this historic mission. Organized in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission tour will launch in 2017 and will travel through 2019. Eyes will be on the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington, which is slated to host the exhibition during the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing in 2019. The Museum in Washington, DC, plans to mark the historic occasion by displaying Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit–made possible through our Kickstarter campaign Reboot the Suit.

The Reston Historic Trust & Museum is open Monday through Saturday and is located at 1639 Washington Plaza-N.

The exhibit is made possible with the support of Jeff and Bezos, Joe Clark, Bruce R. McCaw Family Foundation, the Charles and Lisa Simonyi Fund for Arts and Sciences, John and Susann Norton, and Gregory D. and Jennifer Walston Joh 

Photos courtesy NASA

July 2019 marked 50 years since the historic Apollo 11 moon landing mission, and several college football programs this fall have paid tribute to the historic moment in American space exploration history.

Ohio State was the latest to do so, as the university marching band delivered an Apollo 11 themed performance during halftime of the Buckeyes’ 34-10 Week 6 home win over Michigan State Saturday. It was an impressive one too, as band members first assembled in the shape of a launching Saturn V rocket -- complete with a “USA” banner in the middle -- before transitioning into the shape of an astronaut planting the American flag on the moon.

The tribute didn’t go unnoticed either by one of the two men who actually stepped foot on the moon during that iconic mission: former American astronaut Buzz Aldrin.

An impressive tribute to the Apollo 11 mission! ??Great work @OhioState. I know Neil would have been proud of his home State. https://t.co/aKgclmnLDl

— Buzz Aldrin (@TheRealBuzz) October 9, 2019

“An impressive tribute to the Apollo 11 mission!” Aldrin wrote. “I know Neil (Armstrong) would have been proud of his home state.”

Neil Armstrong, who accompanied Aldrin in stepping foot on the moon surface during that mission -- Armstrong famously became the first man to ever step on the moon in the process -- died in Summer 2012. Armstrong was born in Cincinnati, while Aldrin hails from Glen Ridge, N.J.

Neither of the two attended Ohio State. Aldrin attended the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. Armstrong, meanwhile, attended Purdue University -- a university known for putting a plethora of its former students in space. Purdue has often gone by the nickname “Cradle of Astronauts” with more than two dozen alumni going on to become astronauts. Just this week, Purdue paid tribute to the moon landing mission by releasing new helmets that feature a photo of Armstrong’s footprint left on the moon surface.

When President Kennedy announced the goal of landing on the moon, the great majority of the scientists working on the project were men. But Carolyn Corson, of Eagan, was one of a handful of women who played an important role.

"I'm realizing that it was a big deal," said Corson. "And I just never thought of it as a big deal. Oh sure, I worked on the Saturn V, oh sure, that was good. And now I think back and it was an incredible experience. And I'm so grateful and thankful I got to do this. Not many women did."

Carolyn is a mathematician. She specifically worked the countdown sequence that led to the successful launch of the giant Saturn V rocket.

"It's just an amazing experience that I'm thankful I had a part of," said Corson.

She was one of 12 women referred to as the "Handmaidens to Apollo." They worked on the moon mission in Huntsville, Alabama, from 1967 to 1969.

Handmaiden is an old fashioned term that means female attendant, but Corson and the other ladies had important jobs. She didn't feel second class at all.

"The only thing I know we did have to work harder to maybe prove ourselves to make people know we were okay, we were good people to be there," said Corson.

Next week, Carolyn and seven of the other women she worked with are getting together in Florida to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their little known, but important role in the moon mission. It's the first time in 50 years they've all been together.